Stone Hearts Don’t Bleed

So Salafi Burnout’s website has been taken down.

While the comments were full of trollery, there were a lot of people able to finally talk about the abuse they had suffered at the hands of so called ‘scholars’.

Naively, I had hoped that from revelations there and elsewhere, there would be a movement towards eliminating such cults.

But no, because power protects power and when most of the people hurt are women and children, who cares?

It’s the truly pious MEN and the knowledgeable MEN who are far more important.

Seriously, don’t pretend to be all pious and purifying your heart when you lack basic human empathy.

For those who would like to read more about such cults, I highly recommend:

http://standsfree.blogspot.com/

http://umm-ah.blogspot.com/

http://nuhkeller.blogspot.com/

Updated: Waqt Well Wasted blog has done a brilliant post on spiritual abuse.

Umm ah’s blog is a particularly heartbreaking overview.

Advertisements

34 Responses

  1. “Naively, I had hoped that from revelations there and elsewhere, there would be a movement towards eliminating such cults.”

    The thing is, and I say this knowing that you truly believe much of what you’ve read, nothing that those anonymous bloggers and commenters allege rises to the level of ‘dangerous cult’. Many of the allegations (and yes it is exclusively women who’ve made them) are things that you would find in almost any conservative Muslim milieu.
    -Women told to wear niqab and stay out of the public eye? Ask any Deobandi what they think about that or any salafi or any number of conservative ulama. This is not dhulm. It’s a standard, legitimate Islamic position.
    -Women told to obey their husbands? Read any book of fiqh regarding marital rights and responsibilities.
    -Murids told not to watch TV? Find a serious sheikh who says you should.
    Obey your murshid? Why would someone who takes a tariqa expect not to have to listen to the sheikh?
    And the same for almost every other allegation made on those blogs.

    Additionally, if you read the biographical literature of the sufis, you’ll find murids tested with far more difficult scenarios than anything listed in those blogs.

    If someone said “Abd al-Qadir al-Jalani made female murids wear niqab and made the men do what he instructed”, we wouldn’t bat an eyelash, so why is it a big deal today? Does it really merit blog posts about it with melodramatic titles like “Keep Yourself Alive”?

    No movement has sprung up to do anything about it because nothing needs to be done. Sh. Hamza tells people not to join a tariqa unless they’re already at a certain level of seriousness in their religion and need a sheikh to progress to higher maqams. That’s really the best advice any of these people could be given. Committing oneself to a tariqa is not a way to make cool new friends, it’s a rigorous and often difficult endeavor and it’s not for everyone.

    • Salaam Alaikum,

      Right. I am going to have to bust out the bold font to reply to this.

      ‘nothing that those anonymous bloggers and commenters allege rises to the level of ‘dangerous cult’.

      I do find turning a blind eye to domestic abuse and telling women to stay with their abusive husbands to be very dangerous actually. Or is that not a problem because it’s a ‘women’s issue’?

      ‘Many of the allegations (and yes it is exclusively women who’ve made them) are things that you would find in almost any conservative Muslim milieu.’

      So? Wrong, is wrong, is wrong. Mr X beating his wife is just a bad as Mr Y beating his wife, no matter what their affiliation.

      -Women told to wear niqab and stay out of the public eye? Ask any Deobandi what they think about that or any salafi or any number of conservative ulama. This is not dhulm. It’s a standard, legitimate Islamic position.

      There is a difference between encouraging focus on religious works and being informed that your very existence is such a heinous fitnah, that the less people who catch sight of you, the better.

      This sort of attitude is rampant in Saudi, Yemen and elsewhere. Does it create a more harmonious society filled with strong willed men? No. In fact they are more enslaved by their lusts then ever. Just like the murid in K town who claimed that a long blue coat drove him to lustful distraction.

      The fact is that there are other postitions, which the majority of Muslim women the world over follow and have done so for centuries.

      -Women told to obey their husbands? Read any book of fiqh regarding marital rights and responsibilities.

      Again, there is a difference between obey and be enslaved by. The Qur’an talks of the husband and wife being a mutual mercy to one another, not the wife being abased by him. All Muslims have a right to be treated in a dignified manner.

      Murids told not to watch TV? Find a serious sheikh who says you should.

      So you think being divorced (which is something Allah detests) for watching tv is acceptable?

      Obey your murshid? Why would someone who takes a tariqa expect not to have to listen to the sheikh?

      But should the sheikh involve himself in all the murids affairs? Most Shayukh, steer clear of interefering in non-religious matters.

      And the same for almost every other allegation made on those blogs.

      You do realise every other allegation includes marital rape, domestic violence, the destruction of families, children being left in poverty, verbal abuse, public shaming and back biting?

      Additionally, if you read the biographical literature of the sufis, you’ll find murids tested with far more difficult scenarios than anything listed in those blogs.

      What is being raped and abused by your husband some kind of religious test now?

      If someone said “Abd al-Qadir al-Jalani made female murids wear niqab and made the men do what he instructed”, we wouldn’t bat an eyelash, so why is it a big deal today? Does it really merit blog posts about it with melodramatic titles like “Keep Yourself Alive”?

      For the umpteenth time, this goes far beyond niqab and obedience. And yes, I would say the same no matter who suggested it. This goes back to the concept of WRONG

      And yes, I do think the abuse of women and children is a huge deal

      No movement has sprung up to do anything about it because nothing needs to be done.

      Who cares about the abused women and ruined families? Not you, that’s for sure.

      Where is your soft heart, oh pure hearted one?

  2. I am glad the salafi burnout blog was taken down , I helped in the matter , I complained to wordpress not because I am a follower of the names mentioned but I am an ex husband of a sister who was mentioned my name and place of work , do u know how dangerous that is ? Ex or not no one should be put on blast for a previous sin , I dont care about what was said about Aqil, dawud or the other da;ees , some people dont know when to stop , Allaahu akbar the site was taken down , I am sure many will pop up similar but lets pray that people do not abuse it as they did the other , naming names is one thing but to mention where they work and streets they live on is asking for trouble . You people who did that will be responsible if something horrible happens to them.

    some islam you are practising.

  3. As-Salaamu ‘alaikum,

    I’ve been speaking to one of the sisters who got hurt in Kharabsheh and it was a bit more than just sisters being told to wear niqab and not watch TV. It was not just the mureed sisters who were told this; the non-mureed wives of mureeds were expected to as well. (Note: the technical term for all students of a tariqa, or at least this tariqa, is muntasib, but I use mureed because it’s the commonly-understood colloquial term.) She also told me that there was a lot of spying and backbiting going on and that the leadership encouraged or turned a blind eye to it. I have another female contact in the USA who is seriously distressed by what she heard (this is someone who has been abused twice in her life, most recently by her husband a few years ago). I defended Sh Nuh and Sh Yaqoubi when the allegations first appeared and seemed like nothing more than sectarian backbiting, but if there are serious problems in the community in Jordan, they need to be dealt with rather than just denied.

    At the time I posted an article defending the two shaikhs against the original slanders advanced by Saad Abdullah, Aaminah Hernandez commented and said this about the mureeds she knew:

    Horrible and ridiculous as I find his charges, it is true that there are some (if not many) of Sh Nuh’s followers here in the U.S. that most certainly do treat other Muslims very poorly, both non-tariqa folks, those of other tariqas, and even “lower” members of their own tariqa. Sadly, I’ve found that the majority of his followers (not all) that I have known are amongst the most intolerant and lacking in adab of any people, Muslim or non. I do not, however, feel that has anything to do with him or his teaching, but is simply a human reality. When we get a little knowledge, we think we are better than others.

    I agree with Ilyas that a lot of people have joined who really shouldn’t have, because they saw it as some sort of necessity and perhaps out of a reaction to the “salafi” fitna of the 1990s, and I have my own theory that more people joined Shaikh Nuh’s group than he could really deal with because there are hardly any Sufi shaikhs who spoke English. But I can’t hold my head up high and say I’m part of this or that group when women are getting hurt in or around that group.

    • Walikum salaam,

      “But I can’t hold my head up high and say I’m part of this or that group when women are getting hurt in or around that group.”

      Thank you, seriously thank you.

      I’ve found the misogyny and callousness of some to be truly upsetting. Thank you for counter acting that.

  4. Might I also point out that one of the affected sisters has close connections to one of the groups which have brought traditional scholars to the west and put on gatherings, and is run by people who advanced the same traditionalism before that. This is not a conspiracy against traditional Islam.

    Unfortunately, the trollery and flat-out slander at Salafi Burnout was too much. There was not much BS filtering at that site which was run by a bitter individual who also made posts mocking Islam and posts were made in the names of some “salafi” preachers which were actually from people mocking them. It needed to come down.

  5. Salaam alaikum,

    I imagine his blog will return in some form or another. It said WordPress took it down, that it was violating some standards of use. If he moderates the comments, that would probably work. I thought there was a lot of good in the blog, despite the trolling, and some stuff that I didn’t totally get (like the posting about someone’s nasty divorce? ok…)

    As for a movement against such groups, I think the fact that such stories are coming out is pretty big. And if the so called leadership doesn’t speak out, too bad for them. It’s usually never religious leaders that weed out this type of corruption anyway, unfortunately, it’s usually the ‘ordinary’ followers and external parties that end up doing it.

    Thank you for the links.

  6. It’s not “don’t watch TV” that is the problem, and if you have been to Jordan you know it Ilyas. It is “divorce your wife if she has watched television” that is the problem. And other things, the financial things, that people conveniently ignore in order to say “Oh, the female murids of our shaykh, they just can’t be bothered to follow the rules. Everything in Jordan is fine. They’re just whiny babies.”

    • Assalamu alaikum, respectuflly, there is a big difference between being encouraged to wear niqab (and there is a difference opinion as to its obligatory nature), that you should obey your husbands, or that one should not watch TV, to having people spied on to see what they do in their own homes, overlooking domestic and sexual abuse and calling it “the women’s fault”, and having women being made out to be nothing more than sex objects and maids for their husbands on one hand, and sex objects to toher men on the other. And even visiting being consdered a “waste of time”? Isn’t there a Sunnah of visiting your neighbors, maintaining good ties, etc.?

      Anyway, there is a big difference between encouraging good behavior and overlooking if not encouraging abuse? And “sacrred spying”? and backbiting “for the sake of the tariqa”? You have got to be kidding me!? And what’s scary is some of these people write books on marriage in Islam, and people buy these books, with no idea that these people are allegedly taking information given to them in confidence, from people who are distressed and in pain, and who are then emailing this information to tohers or otherwise sharing it, so that people can gossip about them in the neighborhood? Gosh if this is “traditional Islam” if this is “tasawuf” and “sufism” I want no part of this!

      And thank god, if thi sis true, that I never got caught up in this! I can only imagine how a blind woman like myself could have been used, abused, taken advantage of, in a situation like this, and the thought is horrifying to me.

      And yes, the leaders know about this they should should speak up, and if they don’t then they’re complicit in this by their silence, and allowing more women and children (and men too) to be hurt in the same way! And IMHO, it wouldn’t be backbiting in this case because shouldn’t people be warned?

  7. I’ll keep my reply brief, inshaAllah. My point, which seems to have been missed, us that there is no cult in kharabsheh, just a lot of disappointed people, most of whom were hurt by their husbands. in fact there is not one single allegation that the sheikh did anything to anyone.
    Nor is any of that sexual stuff (which is heartbreaking, as I said on my blog) none of that has anything to do with the sheikh, with the tariqa or even with Islam.
    As for divorce over tv, never happened. the statement ‘send her to her mother’ dosen’t mean divorce. further the issue isn’t tv. It’s refusing to do something your husband asks of you despite the thing being harmful.

    Again, this may not be for everyone, but it’s well within the bounds of mainstream, conservative Islam.

    • @Ilays, sorry bro, but you need to go to Jordan for a few months first before you start commenting about Kharabsheh.

      The TV issue: The husband didn’t have a problem with his wife watching TV. He just wanted to know if it would affect his suluk, since his Sheikh’s position on TV and pictures was what it was. He left Sheikh Nuh soon afterwards.

  8. Assalamu alaikum, Ilyas, I’m not sure if you read any of the links that Safiya provided, but… When leaders of the tariqa are spreading personal intimate details about you, that you went to them in confidence with, because you had no where else to go, then imho, the tariqa has everything to do with it…

    I don’t doubt that some people took the tariqa that maybe shouldn’t have, and I don’t think we’re talking about things that are within the bounds of mainstream Islam, as you say, no one is missing your point, however, this is not what we’re talking about. It’s one thing, as I said, if your husband asks you not to watch TV, and you do it to please him and thereby please Allah, it’s entirely another thing to set up rules and then keep changing them, using “Allah” or Istikara as an excuse, and to have some of these rules adversely affect the women more than the men. and it’s something else to have people sent around to spy on you to make sure that you’re abiding by these rules. Spying and backbiting are clearly haram, last I checked. And it’s entirely something else to have the “leadership” of this group tell you that it’s your fault that your husband is gay, or that you should be happy and just make dua when your husband is sodomizing you or having sex with you in times that are clearly haram, that you should be happy that he desires you so much? etc., etc.

    And when I hear things like “oh shaykh so-and-so used to make his murids to all kinds of things, so what is the problem if Shaykh Nuh makes people do …” (insert whatever we’re talking about here), and I’m not sure how to answer that, and maybe that’s how people who in their gutt feel that something is really amiss are shut up, because it’s said that “shaykh so-and-so” made someone eat dirt or walk through the desert or, well, I can’t remember exactly what he made them do, however, I’d say the difference is that this shaykh would have proven themselves to the murid, would have been in direct contact with said murid (something that Shaykh Nuh doesn’t even seem to be), and this would have been something specific to one murid, tailor made for him/her, and not something put on all of the murids whether or not they are ready for it.

    And also, why should non-murids, who have not even taken the tariqa be forced to follow these rules? It would be one thing if they were in his house or something but Karabsheh is a neighborhood in Jordan, and not his own personal neighborhood at that, so why should he try to control everything that goes on there?

    Again if it was his own house or compound, that would be something different. But it’s not. It would be one thing if rules/conditions were placed on people, individually and not collectively, by a shaykh who had established a long relationship with their murids, so they knew what they could handle, what they needed, etc.

    But having people take bayah with you, over the phone, or via the web, when you’ve not talked to them, don’t know their spiritual or mental state, and may not be able to ascertain whether or not they are ready for such a commitment, and then say “OK, you’re in my group now go and throw away your TV’s, and stop singing and listening to music”, along with all of the other “rules” imposed on people in his tariqa, imho, is very irresponsible.

    And let’s not forget that Shaykh Nuh is a human being, he is not a Prophet or saint, etc., and while “the flesh of the scholars is poison”, if said scholars/shaykhs are abusing people, or turning a blind eye to said abuse, or spreaidng tales/backbiting themselves, then I think we should speak up and criticize and warn people against goin there. Because he has causd harm to people in the past and there seems to be no indication that he’ll let up in the future.

    I also want to say that I did not believe all of this when the allegations first came out, and I can’t say that I’m 100% sure that I believe them now. However, too many people have said too much for me to just pretend like I don’t have any concerns. And I need more of an explanation for why these allegations are coming out then “these are just a bunch of disgruntled women (and keep in mind you’re telling me it’s only women) who are just mad at the shaykh or don’t like him. Or “we dont’ have to defned ourselves because the truth stands out clear from error”, or “we don’t have time for such things on the Internet”. As an “outsider” you’ve got to do a lot better than that.

    No matter what “the truth” is, I have enough misgivings that it’s caused a lot of distress as regards my place as a Muslim, has lowered my iman immensely, and has caused me to wonder who, exactly, in the “Muslim leadership”, I should trust. And for that reason alone, these allegations need to be answered and refuted, and people need to know that they will be safe, not abused, and that if they are abused, they have the support that they need. And if they can’t get this, then they should not go over there!

    Because if your marital problems are going to be gossip fodder for the neighborhood, spurred on by the “leadership” who supposedly is supposed to be so pious and so far on the spiritual path, sorry, but I feel the need to run far, far away from this!

    • Salaam Alaikum,

      I agree with every word you’ve written Ginny. Masha Allah.

    • Salam Ginny,

      Thank you so much for your posts. Your posts are really always so clear and balanced. I decided to leave the tariqa about a week ago after reading so many things and also experiencing things first hand. I could keep making excuses, but a heart-felt instinct said that there’s something wrong. I put my non-tariqa wife through hell, and just when I was ready to divorce her over TV I suddenly came to my senses and got out of this group. I had been in tariqa for quite a few years. The “clouds book” (tariqa notes, 1999) seemed so balanced, albeit strict, but then the blanket level of inflexibility I saw later on seemed very conterproductive. It got to the point when people are condemned for a photograph but backbiting is free for all, and it seems to be getting worse. Its sad. Sheikh Nuh has done a lot for traditional Islam, but there is something going wrong in terms of tariqa here. I also feel a bit disillusioned with Muslim leadership, I don’t know who to trust now. Well I guess I just can be a normal Muslim and worship Allah and strive to follow the sunnah. Hey, I’d rather get to a low place in heaven as a religious person, than follow a tariqa into hell. So cynical, but feeling a bit traumatised by the whole thing…

  9. How true, the title of this post!

  10. It’s good to see that some reasonable and responsible comments are finally being shared.

    @ Ilyas. Shuyukh test their murids out in different ways, true. However, not everything the Sheikh does is a test. The Sheikh isn’t out there to make his murids struggle and fail, the Sheikh is there to help teach the murid about how to impliment the Qu’ran and Sunnah, internally and externally. The Prophet (pbuh) was sent as a Mercy to mankind, and Murshids are supposed to be inheritors of the Prophet.

    The difference of opinions between scholars is a mercy, and a murshid should use that wisely, to help his murids grow. You can’t apply the same level of strictness to all murids, yet day after day we see how Nuh does that without a care in the world.

    As for Sheikh Abdel-Qadir el-Jilani, one of the 4 Qutbs, what makes you think he even had female murids? It wasn’t the habit of Murshids to take on female murids in the past.

  11. Safiya>JazakuAllahkhairun for posting this and posting the links. The “Ah” blog was quite insightful and yes I could relate to a lot of the problems going on, and I know the “blue raincoat” is about me and what I went through, and I have no idea who the person is that posted about the story and knew about that incident. I’ve been trying to remember who was in the room at that time when I was warned about the jacket and yet I can’t remember and yet I do remember telling people about it, yet not mentioning the exact details so still wondering who it was and that it had to be someone that was there.

    It is still a struggle as I’m juggling 3-4 jobs to pay for my divorce yet I know I’ll soon be able to relieve some of it once my summer classes are over and I’ll get a break for a bit, before my fall classes start. Insha’Allah I do pray that we that have been through that will get through and I know Allah knows the Truth and Knows Best and HE will reveal all when the time is time insha’Allah.

  12. Assalaamu’Alaykum 🙂
    I remember reading some of the stuff from Umar Lee on the Salafi movement, and then there was another thing there about the Sufi cults. I was shocked at the amount and type of comments that it generated, and I almost gave up all association with Muslims that week. There is something really wrong with us when we can’t see the pain that is being generated. At one point in time, maybe I would have been one of those who refused to believe it. But, having seen the abuse of Sheikhs first hand, it’s literally impossible for me to say these are just disgruntled murids who are finding the straight path difficult to follow, or have an axe to grind. I am just shocked that it’s as widespread as it is.

    I understand that questioning the integrity of any sheikh is difficult. However, Sheikhs are not Nabis, and they are not angels, and they are not Allah. They have human failings, some of them more than others. Acknowledging this is difficult, as these are our guides on the path to better spirituality. If we can’t trust them in the deepest matters of faith, then who do we trust? But, so long as there is no acknowledgment and rectification from the Sheikhs of the same path, then it really is best to limit our trust to matters of technicality and academics. Ok, if one has a sound knowledge of moon-sighting, prayer, zakat, and another has sound knowledge of other issues, then spread the Sheikh-love around. Nothing in Islam says we need to bow down to any one Sheikh.

    The inability to acknowledge that Sheikhs make mistakes is really disturbing, and right there indicates a disease in any given “movement.” To whom is our loyalty? To a Sheikh who answers to nobody in this world, or to fellow Muslims who are saying there is a problem? Should not our loyalty be to justice for the sake of Allah? Is that not what Rasulullah sallallaahu alayhi wa sallam stood for, when for example, he (SAW) said, “If my beloved Fatima (radiAllahu anha) committed theft, I would order her hand cut off.” And when he, sallallaahu alayhi wa sallam said, in his final speech, “Beware of how you treat the women and the orphans.” What do those words mean? Do the rights of a Sheikh exceed the example of the Prophet (SAW)? Since when did committing oppression, from one Muslim to another, become OK?

    And that brings me to another point about Sheikhs in general. Why do so many of them quote their own Sheikhs more than they quote from the Qur’an and Hadith? I don’t really care what your Sheikh had to say, unless it’s directly related to something the Prophet SAW said, or related to the Qur’an. It means less than nothing to me, when I’m sitting in a lecture expecting something very different. I don’t want the Hadith and Seerah of your Sheikh, unless it’s in very limited doses, because I have yet to fully absorb the Hadith and Seerah of the Prophet SAW. When you’ve passed those on to me, as well as an understanding of the Qur’an, then we can move on to the Sheikh of the Sheikh!

    At the end of the day, if you’re defending your Sheikh, saying that Abdul Qadir Jilani did such and such, and nobody complained…remember that part: nobody complained. There was a reason they didn’t complain: because he had a conscience, because he was not expecting anybody to apologize for him, and because he perhaps did nothing to them for them to complain about. Even Umar radiaAllahu anh would answer to the complaints of the people. That’s not a sign of weakness. But letting such accusations build up and pretending like the women who are speaking up are all psychotic…well, that’s not the kind of character-building I’m looking for. Shouldn’t a Sheikh who has murids be able to recognize when his advice is causing a dip in imaan, since his responsibility is to help strengthen imaan?

    And finally, the thing that really makes something a cult, whether it’s the tableegh movement, or the sufis, or the salafis, or modernists is this: the absolute refusal to acknowledge that there are other correct methods of practice. A token acknowledgement of other methods is not good enough. That kind of narrow-minded thinking is a huge red flag. As is the fact that once you get sucked into any one path, it is very difficult to extricate yourself. If you can’t wake up one morning and question what you’re experiencing, without being branded as a troublemaker, then you’re definitely in a cult.

    I am upset enough at the end of this that I once again wanting to never be surrounded by Muslims, and just want to be alone. Such happenings really are an iman-buster. For me, it’s about way more than Sheikh Nuh (I’ve got no experience with him or his murids) or Sheikh whoever. It’s about all of them, because many are part-taking in this sort of behavior in one form or another, and the rest are not doing anything about it.

    That was a bit long…I’m sorry. But I could not leave out my two cents worth. I suspect there are typos galore…it’s really late here!

    • Salaam Alaikum,

      Thank you so much for such a thorough comment.

      “It’s about all of them, because many are part-taking in this sort of behavior in one form or another, and the rest are not doing anything about it.”

      This. A thousand times this.

      After Aasiya Hassan’s murder, there was all the outrage and vows that the Muslim community must do more, men should protect women and believe them when they speak out…

      … then we see what happens to women who do try to speak out.

  13. Assalamu alaikum, *digital Nomad, yeah, it was an iman-busting thing for me too, really awful! I didn’t want to believe it either! And I have to say that Ilashed out pretty harshly at the first people to amke the allegations, and I dind’t want to believe it. But after so many people and when you start actually talking to women with names, etc., and they aren’t just annonymous people ont he Net anymore, then it gets harder to just nignore then, call them names, discount them as just not wanting to conquer their nafs enough.

  14. I really don’t know what I believe about any of these stories but I do see a disturbing trend in silencing any questioning of authority of a Sheikh by those tried and true words, “it’s just your nafs.”

    Is there anything that will silence a student more quickly than that expression? Especially since many students of Sufism have the ultimate goal of fighting against their nafs.

  15. Just wanted to let you know I tagged you.

  16. There are little bits of stories here, and little bits of stories there, and everyone is trying to piece together the jigsaw puzzle, with snippets of chat that depressingly add up to a very sad state of affairs. But the truth is so much sadder than all this, and a lot worse. For all the doubters, the stories are sadly true, but the sum total of it all is so much worse, and for all concerned.
    Pre-Ramadan there seems to be only dua left, as no one who counts is listening.

  17. As-Salaamu ‘alaikum,

    I just read that article Albedo linked and she said she didn’t really believe in it “even at her most fervent”. This is also true with one of the apostates referred to on Umm-ah’s blog. I think we should not read too much into the fact that some ex-murids leave Islam because some of them were shaky in their faith anyway. People left Islam in the time of the Prophet (sall’ Allahu ‘alaihi wa sallam) and there was one man who was fighting like the best of them, but the Prophet (sall’ Allahu ‘alaihi wa sallam) said he was destined for the Fire, and he was later found dead by his own hand. The problem with the Jordan situation is that people are getting hurt.

  18. Salaam ‘alaikum,

    Reading that blog*, her loss of faith clearly has nothing to do with the tariqa. Rather it seems that she felt religion poorly addressed her goals in life.
    It should be noted that her family did not move to Jordan to be close to Sheikh Nuh. (If I recall correctly, her husband, who has not connection to any tariqa, is Jordanian and wanted to move their for his own reasons.)
    It’s disingenuous to associate this very sad case with Sheikh Nuh, as it has nothing to do with him.

    *Sis. Safiya, you may want to remove that link for the sake of the author.

  19. […] Jo Blogs » Former K-Towners who leave Islam Recently sister Safiya (Outlines) posted an article about the situation of women who got hurt in the Kharabsheh or “K-Town” community in Jordan; […]

  20. […] Comments Safiya Outlines on Stone Hearts Don’t …Safiya Outlines on Stone Hearts Don’t …Atia on Scribbles Not Outlines 7: […]

  21. […] against Shaykh Nuh and his tariqa (and accusations against Shaykh Al Yaqoubi).  Brother Yusuf and Sister Safiya have given their opinions on the matter.  Some of us have even read the infamous Salafi Burnout […]

  22. I am shocked!

  23. […] reported (much of it on the preserved K-Town Survivors blog; see these two old articles at Outlines [1], [2]). This is something I had heard going on in at least one of the less reputable […]

  24. […] TCM: In the few cases where alleged victims have gone public, many Muslims responded very critically, arguing there is no proof, that these are “random” “anonymous” people making claims, and […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: