As long as we are alive, our dreams will never die

Today we were unlucky, but remember we only have to be lucky once. You have to be lucky always

A statement made, some time ago, to a female political figure as equally controversial as Benazir Bhutto .

Yesterday, for those who believe in luck, Benazir Bhutto’s luck finally ran out.

Inna lilahi wa inna ilayhi raji’oon

Still, there are no actions without consequences, and what her death will mean for both Pakistan and the wider world is currently the generator of fierce speculation and hand-wringing.

The statements that her death also equates to the death of democracy in Pakistan fill me with unease.

It is true that we live in the new class system of the media, where public figures are more accessible and yet more exalted then ever before. However, people and society are more then just the pawns of the elite.

The saddest aspect of the debunking of Marx, is the loss of his pioneering work in the study of history, his describing it as being more then the activities of royalty and nobles and instead looking at the impact made both upon and by ordinary people.

Democracy is spoken about like the gift of benevolent rulers, who put it into practice overnight. This simply isn’t true. For every right we enjoy today, ordinary people had to fight and campaign to achieve it. We may not know their names but we should be thankful for their actions always.

People have the power to effect change. So long that fact is remembered and acted upon, then democracy will outlive us all and it will never die.

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6 Responses

  1. Salaam. Great post, barikallah. This is a nervous time for Pakistan and Muslim women in the political world.

  2. Leaving aside the chaotic ramifications Bhutto’s assasination will have on Pakistan and perhaps the region as a whole, internationally speaking it will no doubt serve to fuel the fires of doubt about the ability of Muslims to apply a civilized form of democracy. Maybe it will encourage the supporters of Western intervention in the region’s affairs? Probably an exaggeration, but who knows. I really don’t want to think about the damage it could inflict on Pakistan, but since I know very little about the country’s politics, who am I to make predictions?

    “Democracy is spoken about like the gift of benevolent rulers, who put it into practice overnight. This simply isn’t true. For every right we enjoy today, ordinary people had to fight and campaign to achieve it. We may not know their names but we should be thankful for their actions always.”
    Very true. Unfortunately, “history remembers kings, not soldiers”.

  3. As-salaamu-alaikum,

    This post was so short but so meaningful. Masha’allah. The “common” people can do more than they realize.

  4. Salaam Safiya :),

    I do not know much about Benazir Bhutto,but I was really schocked when she was murdered.
    Yes,democracy starts with small changes even one person can make.I always like to remember the story of that old black lady in U.S.A.,who years ago entered a bus that was meant only for white people.The rest is history.

    May Allah always bless you Safiya :)!

  5. (Classical) Liberal Democracy, secularism…both kufr.

    “The saddest aspect of the debunking of Marx, is the loss of his pioneering work in the study of history, his describing it as being more then the activities of royalty and nobles and instead looking at the impact made both upon and by ordinary people.”

    What? If anything Marx was a vigorous anti-humanist who radically limited the scope for human agency in history.

  6. Salaam Alaikum,

    Yay! I love it when people bust out the k word, pick a quote out of context and completely miss the point of what I have written. Even better, when they don’t put a name to their comment.

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